User Experience

3 reasons why you should care about UXD?

User experience design (UXD) explores feasible solutions to design problems. It uncovers user needs and business goals and areas where the two overlap.

UXD is the sweet spot between what people need and what the business wants ⁠— its where the opportunities for competitive advantage exists. Those are the places where you can do something unique, that's different, and that elevates you above the competition.  

So, we understand the overview of what UXD is but let's delve a little deeper about why we should care so much about it.

Our designs get used by people.

All of us have experiences, and some of them are good while some are not very good. It's the bad ones that stick with people — it's painful, and we want to avoid them at all costs.  

When we do have bad experiences, we end up telling people — on social media and in conversations. (If your anything like my family you'll tell everyone you know in 0.5 seconds of it happening). From a business perspective, you don't want to be the company everyone is complaining about online. It's destroying.

I have an example of a bad experience.
A salesman was blocking my progress and showing me stuff that I just wasn't interested in. It wasn't the ideal experience, and to be honest, I was annoyed and left a sour taste about that brand.

You have a few seconds to capture the right message — that salesman I bumped into went about it the wrong way. Humans want fulfilling and valuable information or products. We never have enough time or money to devote to things, and we NEED to have our monies worth.

It's not easy, and humans are complicated! We want our needs met, and more often than not, we know what we want. Businesses need to learn about their customers, who they are and what they're looking for. Without this, your product or services are operating in the dark.

We want our question answered

What is it? Is it what I want? Is it valuable? What happens if I get stuck? How do I talk to somebody? These are all questions we have when we come to a website. And we want to be treated with respect.

Respect your customers, and if you cannot answer their question, you can still offer value by giving them more information to guide them on how they can get the best outcome.  

After doing years of user research, it has become quite clear that people want a sense that someone cares enough about them and to give some value in return for their time and money spent.

First impressions get formed through visual representation.

We all form an opinion when we first see something — whether its good or bad.

Let's take an example — the Ring doorbell.
It looks modern, simple and technologically advanced. The device keeps you safe; it's adaptable and records activity without you having to do anything. It's a positive user experience. To get all this in one visual representation takes little effort for a significant return on investment — that is value for your effort.

Human assumptions are quite scary. When we see something, we instantly make a judgement. Our actions are bound to visual expectations — what does it do, how much does it cost, how difficult is it to use?

Let's wrap it up.

Above are three very valid reasons why you should care about UXD. A task complete is not the same as success. A person may be able to get the desired results, but unless it's easy, they won't be back to use it the second time.  

Experience should be painless, elegant, and straightforward.

No items found.

User Experience

3 reasons why you should care about UXD?

User experience design (UXD) explores feasible solutions to design problems. It uncovers user needs and business goals and areas where the two overlap.

UXD is the sweet spot between what people need and what the business wants ⁠— its where the opportunities for competitive advantage exists. Those are the places where you can do something unique, that's different, and that elevates you above the competition.  

So, we understand the overview of what UXD is but let's delve a little deeper about why we should care so much about it.

Our designs get used by people.

All of us have experiences, and some of them are good while some are not very good. It's the bad ones that stick with people — it's painful, and we want to avoid them at all costs.  

When we do have bad experiences, we end up telling people — on social media and in conversations. (If your anything like my family you'll tell everyone you know in 0.5 seconds of it happening). From a business perspective, you don't want to be the company everyone is complaining about online. It's destroying.

I have an example of a bad experience.
A salesman was blocking my progress and showing me stuff that I just wasn't interested in. It wasn't the ideal experience, and to be honest, I was annoyed and left a sour taste about that brand.

You have a few seconds to capture the right message — that salesman I bumped into went about it the wrong way. Humans want fulfilling and valuable information or products. We never have enough time or money to devote to things, and we NEED to have our monies worth.

It's not easy, and humans are complicated! We want our needs met, and more often than not, we know what we want. Businesses need to learn about their customers, who they are and what they're looking for. Without this, your product or services are operating in the dark.

We want our question answered

What is it? Is it what I want? Is it valuable? What happens if I get stuck? How do I talk to somebody? These are all questions we have when we come to a website. And we want to be treated with respect.

Respect your customers, and if you cannot answer their question, you can still offer value by giving them more information to guide them on how they can get the best outcome.  

After doing years of user research, it has become quite clear that people want a sense that someone cares enough about them and to give some value in return for their time and money spent.

First impressions get formed through visual representation.

We all form an opinion when we first see something — whether its good or bad.

Let's take an example — the Ring doorbell.
It looks modern, simple and technologically advanced. The device keeps you safe; it's adaptable and records activity without you having to do anything. It's a positive user experience. To get all this in one visual representation takes little effort for a significant return on investment — that is value for your effort.

Human assumptions are quite scary. When we see something, we instantly make a judgement. Our actions are bound to visual expectations — what does it do, how much does it cost, how difficult is it to use?

Let's wrap it up.

Above are three very valid reasons why you should care about UXD. A task complete is not the same as success. A person may be able to get the desired results, but unless it's easy, they won't be back to use it the second time.  

Experience should be painless, elegant, and straightforward.

No items found.

User experience design (UXD) explores feasible solutions to design problems. It uncovers user needs and business goals and areas where the two overlap.

UXD is the sweet spot between what people need and what the business wants ⁠— its where the opportunities for competitive advantage exists. Those are the places where you can do something unique, that's different, and that elevates you above the competition.  

So, we understand the overview of what UXD is but let's delve a little deeper about why we should care so much about it.

Our designs get used by people.

All of us have experiences, and some of them are good while some are not very good. It's the bad ones that stick with people — it's painful, and we want to avoid them at all costs.  

When we do have bad experiences, we end up telling people — on social media and in conversations. (If your anything like my family you'll tell everyone you know in 0.5 seconds of it happening). From a business perspective, you don't want to be the company everyone is complaining about online. It's destroying.

I have an example of a bad experience.
A salesman was blocking my progress and showing me stuff that I just wasn't interested in. It wasn't the ideal experience, and to be honest, I was annoyed and left a sour taste about that brand.

You have a few seconds to capture the right message — that salesman I bumped into went about it the wrong way. Humans want fulfilling and valuable information or products. We never have enough time or money to devote to things, and we NEED to have our monies worth.

It's not easy, and humans are complicated! We want our needs met, and more often than not, we know what we want. Businesses need to learn about their customers, who they are and what they're looking for. Without this, your product or services are operating in the dark.

We want our question answered

What is it? Is it what I want? Is it valuable? What happens if I get stuck? How do I talk to somebody? These are all questions we have when we come to a website. And we want to be treated with respect.

Respect your customers, and if you cannot answer their question, you can still offer value by giving them more information to guide them on how they can get the best outcome.  

After doing years of user research, it has become quite clear that people want a sense that someone cares enough about them and to give some value in return for their time and money spent.

First impressions get formed through visual representation.

We all form an opinion when we first see something — whether its good or bad.

Let's take an example — the Ring doorbell.
It looks modern, simple and technologically advanced. The device keeps you safe; it's adaptable and records activity without you having to do anything. It's a positive user experience. To get all this in one visual representation takes little effort for a significant return on investment — that is value for your effort.

Human assumptions are quite scary. When we see something, we instantly make a judgement. Our actions are bound to visual expectations — what does it do, how much does it cost, how difficult is it to use?

Let's wrap it up.

Above are three very valid reasons why you should care about UXD. A task complete is not the same as success. A person may be able to get the desired results, but unless it's easy, they won't be back to use it the second time.  

Experience should be painless, elegant, and straightforward.

User Experience

3 reasons why you should care about UXD?

User experience design (UXD) explores feasible solutions to design problems. It uncovers user needs and business goals and areas where the two overlap.

UXD is the sweet spot between what people need and what the business wants ⁠— its where the opportunities for competitive advantage exists. Those are the places where you can do something unique, that's different, and that elevates you above the competition.  

So, we understand the overview of what UXD is but let's delve a little deeper about why we should care so much about it.

Our designs get used by people.

All of us have experiences, and some of them are good while some are not very good. It's the bad ones that stick with people — it's painful, and we want to avoid them at all costs.  

When we do have bad experiences, we end up telling people — on social media and in conversations. (If your anything like my family you'll tell everyone you know in 0.5 seconds of it happening). From a business perspective, you don't want to be the company everyone is complaining about online. It's destroying.

I have an example of a bad experience.
A salesman was blocking my progress and showing me stuff that I just wasn't interested in. It wasn't the ideal experience, and to be honest, I was annoyed and left a sour taste about that brand.

You have a few seconds to capture the right message — that salesman I bumped into went about it the wrong way. Humans want fulfilling and valuable information or products. We never have enough time or money to devote to things, and we NEED to have our monies worth.

It's not easy, and humans are complicated! We want our needs met, and more often than not, we know what we want. Businesses need to learn about their customers, who they are and what they're looking for. Without this, your product or services are operating in the dark.

We want our question answered

What is it? Is it what I want? Is it valuable? What happens if I get stuck? How do I talk to somebody? These are all questions we have when we come to a website. And we want to be treated with respect.

Respect your customers, and if you cannot answer their question, you can still offer value by giving them more information to guide them on how they can get the best outcome.  

After doing years of user research, it has become quite clear that people want a sense that someone cares enough about them and to give some value in return for their time and money spent.

First impressions get formed through visual representation.

We all form an opinion when we first see something — whether its good or bad.

Let's take an example — the Ring doorbell.
It looks modern, simple and technologically advanced. The device keeps you safe; it's adaptable and records activity without you having to do anything. It's a positive user experience. To get all this in one visual representation takes little effort for a significant return on investment — that is value for your effort.

Human assumptions are quite scary. When we see something, we instantly make a judgement. Our actions are bound to visual expectations — what does it do, how much does it cost, how difficult is it to use?

Let's wrap it up.

Above are three very valid reasons why you should care about UXD. A task complete is not the same as success. A person may be able to get the desired results, but unless it's easy, they won't be back to use it the second time.  

Experience should be painless, elegant, and straightforward.

User experience design (UXD) explores feasible solutions to design problems. It uncovers user needs and business goals and areas where the two overlap.

UXD is the sweet spot between what people need and what the business wants ⁠— its where the opportunities for competitive advantage exists. Those are the places where you can do something unique, that's different, and that elevates you above the competition.  

So, we understand the overview of what UXD is but let's delve a little deeper about why we should care so much about it.

Our designs get used by people.

All of us have experiences, and some of them are good while some are not very good. It's the bad ones that stick with people — it's painful, and we want to avoid them at all costs.  

When we do have bad experiences, we end up telling people — on social media and in conversations. (If your anything like my family you'll tell everyone you know in 0.5 seconds of it happening). From a business perspective, you don't want to be the company everyone is complaining about online. It's destroying.

I have an example of a bad experience.
A salesman was blocking my progress and showing me stuff that I just wasn't interested in. It wasn't the ideal experience, and to be honest, I was annoyed and left a sour taste about that brand.

You have a few seconds to capture the right message — that salesman I bumped into went about it the wrong way. Humans want fulfilling and valuable information or products. We never have enough time or money to devote to things, and we NEED to have our monies worth.

It's not easy, and humans are complicated! We want our needs met, and more often than not, we know what we want. Businesses need to learn about their customers, who they are and what they're looking for. Without this, your product or services are operating in the dark.

We want our question answered

What is it? Is it what I want? Is it valuable? What happens if I get stuck? How do I talk to somebody? These are all questions we have when we come to a website. And we want to be treated with respect.

Respect your customers, and if you cannot answer their question, you can still offer value by giving them more information to guide them on how they can get the best outcome.  

After doing years of user research, it has become quite clear that people want a sense that someone cares enough about them and to give some value in return for their time and money spent.

First impressions get formed through visual representation.

We all form an opinion when we first see something — whether its good or bad.

Let's take an example — the Ring doorbell.
It looks modern, simple and technologically advanced. The device keeps you safe; it's adaptable and records activity without you having to do anything. It's a positive user experience. To get all this in one visual representation takes little effort for a significant return on investment — that is value for your effort.

Human assumptions are quite scary. When we see something, we instantly make a judgement. Our actions are bound to visual expectations — what does it do, how much does it cost, how difficult is it to use?

Let's wrap it up.

Above are three very valid reasons why you should care about UXD. A task complete is not the same as success. A person may be able to get the desired results, but unless it's easy, they won't be back to use it the second time.  

Experience should be painless, elegant, and straightforward.

Hello, I’m Becky Birch, a UX design consultant based in Manchester. I hope you enjoy reading my blog.

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